How does the Fujifilm X10 perform? Is it a nice walk around 35mm camera? Does the retro look appeal to you?

Fujifilm X10 with Gordy's wrist strap and Artisan & Artist shutter release button

Fujifilm X10 with Gordy's wrist strap and Artisan & Artist shutter release button

In reality, there is no perfect camera.  I have been searching a nice little camera with good image quality (possibly taken in RAW and JPEG formats) and video as a back up or a second body when making a trip overseas. All in vain. My previous point-and-shoot Canon G7’s picture is awfully noisy in higher ISO and it only records JPEG format.
I have considered the Canon GX1, the Nikon V1, the Panasonic and Olympus mirrorless and the Fujiflim X10.  The Canon GX1 is a bit disappointing except the larger CMOS sensor.  Its optical viewfinder is basically a flaw.  I simply think holding the Nikon V1 will not be too comfortable (trust me the lack of a grip is a problem) although a review by Rob Galbraith tells us how amazing it is.  I haven’t fully tested a Panasonic or Olympus mirrorless but the Panasonic GF1 appeals to me as a small sized camera with decent video recording.  At that time I only used the pancake lens (20mm) that comes with GF1. Oh, I should have thought of the latest Panasonic GX1 , a camera of compact design, with an excellent range of lenses and high definition video recording functionality.  It is also a micro G series system camera. Why do I invest in another system?  With all the accessories I have to purchase at the end it won’t be cheap.
I haven’t tried Olympus yet.  My very early impression with its EP-1 (at least 2 years ago)was that the autofocus is too slow. But Olympus recently returns with the OM-D EM-5 reminding us one of the frequent-mentioned camera systems.  It could be a success: smaller body size and the innovative 5-axis body stabilisation.
Still there are too many left to choose from. What about Fujifilm?
Today Fujifilm is not only a name of the film.  While its X100 was receiving good applause during its launch last year, I was travelling in Dublin. In the busy city centre I saw a camera shop offered it at a attractive price of €999 in the front display window. I should have bought it. Today back home in Sydney, some shops still price it around AU$1200. I have a reason to believe it will stay strong because of its quality and design, not to mention there is a all-black limited edition Premium Set.
Until today I have a chance to play with the X10.
With the little brother of the X family in hand, you can tell X10 is not really that small (see its specifications here).  Surely you cannot place it in your pocket because of the articulated zoom lens (although in its OFF mode the length is just fine).  The ON/OFF function is on the lens barrel by setting the point of distance, which is a very smart design.
The hand grip with the leather-like finish gives us a stronger hold of the solid build body and with the wrist strap you could hold the camera firmly. Fitting a Gordy’s camera wrist strap, you are ready to shoot any time.
Do you want to add a filter to the manual zoom lens (28mm-112mm)? But the filter thread of it is rare: 40mm.  If you have the original lens hood LH-X10 (or from the third party), then you can attach a 52mm filter to it.  You can visit this site to get a clear picture of how it looks although adding the filter and the mount means the whole module are a little bigger than the lens. The entire camera looks prettier if the lens hood is attached. On the other hand, that makes the Fujifilm X10 even bulkier.  Still the overall size is acceptable.
More to come…
(Note:  the featured image of this post was not taken by a Fujifilm X10.)

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